Tag Archives: e-learning

Here, There and Everywhere: The Arrival of the Digital Professionalism ‘Interactive’ Mapping Tool for Social Work Students, Practitioners and Academics

* Please note that this blog was updated (Jan 12th 2020) by a social work student colleague, and again by me on April 19th, 2021 – with updates to the Digital Professionalism Mapping Tool and the CoActEd Learner Personal Learning Network Mapping Tool

Please scroll below to read a well considered reflection on the use / usefulness of the mapping tool by Cheryl 

This short blog outlines an update to the Digital Professionalism Mapping Tool for Social Work, previously discussed here, here and here.

Those who have already read the blogs and publication (highlighted above) will know that I developed the Digital Professionalism Mapping Tool (based on the work of David White) to enable social work students, practitioners and educators to review their technology usage and presence online; as related to the professional standards and ethics of the profession. The tool has been received positively across the profession, and indeed by other professional groupings as they think about what Turner describes as the ‘brave new world’ (2015). Regardless of the enthusiasm expressed about the usefulness of the tool, I had never been quite satisfied with how it was or could be accessed. I had always been niggled by the fact that it was predominantly a paper-based activity that ironically reviews presence and activity online. And whilst that has been ‘ok’, I wanted to offer a more accessible alternative.  Something that I had never got around to sorting out until now.

I was recently introduced to Laura Ridings, a new appointment to the University of Central Lancashire, located within the TELT team. Laura is a graphic designer and a former teacher, turned e-learning developer. A wonderful combination of creativity, pedagogy and technological skill; and the most pragmatic ‘nerd’ (her word not mine) that I have ever met. Within hours of me sharing my ‘wants’ she had produced a more realistic version of my ‘needs’; in other words taken the Digital Professionalism Mapping Tool online and turned it into an interactive tool.

I am sharing the updated version of the tool here … in the hope that it will remain useful as social work education and practice continue to navigate the issues and possibilities of the digital shift.

As you can now use the tool here, there and everywhere please let us know what you think in the comments box below or on Twitter @amltaylor66 and @LRidingsUCLan

AMLTaylor-Beswick

*Update:

My name is Cheryl Bardell and I am a student on a BA (hons) Social Work degree apprenticeship, and was introduced to the Digital Professionalism ‘Interactive’ Mapping Tool as part of my Introduction to Social Work Practice module. Having worked with Children’s Services for over four years, and worked with children and young people for the last fourteen years, all my previous training around the use of technology was centred on how young people use social media, and heavily biased to it potentially having a negative impact on them by exposing them to possible grooming and exploitation, and poor self-image and mental health. I had never really considered, let alone reflected, on how my use of digital technologies fits in with, and impacts, my practice.

As well as recording ‘what’ I use, I realised that the tool allowed me to think about the ‘size’ of my use and how this is divided between both personal and professional use. I chose to draw a box around each site/application to visualise what my use “looks like” and the breadth of functions each site fulfils for me. The best example of this would be Facebook; I had always thought that my use of Facebook was strictly “personal”: keeping in touch with friends and family, news from my community and the wider world etc.; but a quick scroll through my newsfeed highlighted that I am following a large number of pages directly related to my work including local services and resources, charities, and blogs thus impacting on and informing my practice. Also, considering whether I’m a visitor or a resident enabled me to consider the time spent on the site and how active my participation is. My use of WhatsApp is polarised; I use it as a Professional to communicate with some of the families I work with, particularly young people, but my use of it is limited whereas my personal use of it is far greater, for this reason I chose to plot it on the quadrant twice to clearly differentiate its two functions for me.

Moving forward with my studies and as my practice develops, it would be interesting to repeat this tool to see whether there are any changes. I’d hope that the range of sites and technologies I use grows and evolves in a way that enables me to become a knowledgeable practitioner better equipped and informed to support the people I work with and for.

Thank you Cheryl. I very much appreciate the time you’ve taken to reflect further on your use of the digital professionalism mapping tool. I really like the way you’ve used colour and shape to illustrate usage. It adds an interesting aspect to the visual representation of choices and presence online.

Once you’ve completed your comparative mapping you might like to sole author a blog post on your digital learning and development. I’d be more than happy to host that blog here.

Thank you once again for this very well articulated piece of work 👌